MANAGING MIRANDA RIGHTS PEOPLE

I’ve never had them read to me, but I’ve watched enough police shows to have the Miranda Rights memorized. They read, “You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say or do can and will be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to an attorney. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed to you. Do you understand these rights as they have been read to you?” The first part is my focus.

As a practicing leader for 2+ decades I have encountered many of what I call “Miranda Rights People.” If you are a leader you probably know exactly what I am talking about. These are people who aren’t on board with where you are trying to lead them. They seem to have an opposing view of everything and they like to tell you about it at every opportunity. The reason I titled this post Managing Miranda Rights People is because they really can’t be led. They can’t be led because they refuse to follow. So, they can only be managed. If it helps, think of them like chronic pain (only if it helps).

So why do I refer to them as Miranda Rights people? I do this as a reminder to me that when I encounter one of them I have a right to remain silent. And most of the time I will because I know that whatever I say or do can and will be used against me. Do you understand these rights?

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5 Responses to MANAGING MIRANDA RIGHTS PEOPLE

  1. Guinivere says:

    Great read, we both enjoyed

    Becoming an instrument of His glory and grace
    Guinivere

    >

  2. Great Blog and Advice! After 40 plus years in ministry, I can say that this is truly sage advice and well worth serious consideration for anyone in leadership. Jenny and I both loved it!

    • Brent Kimball says:

      Thanks for the encouragement Wayne! Whoa, I don’t know about “sage.” That is pretty heavy :). There aren’t a lot of Miranda Rights People but they do exist.

  3. Adora l. Bunch says:

    Amen. Yes, silence is golden like Jesus did when they accused him. Sometimes it’s so hard to do but so necessary! Not responding is sometimes the best thing to do. It’s not easy for me by nature, but I’m learning. Thanks for that reminder

    • Brent Kimball says:

      That is right Adora, Jesus was silent at times. He chose not to respond to some of his critics and those who simply weren’t going to follow, but who weren’t going to go away. Great insight. Thanks.

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